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I have an electrosmog meter. Can I use it to measure dirty electricity?

No they will not.

There are 4 kinds of EMF pollution common in homes and other buildings today: 60 Hz AC electric fields, 60 Hz AC magnetic fields, dirty electricity, and wireless radiation (i.e., radio frequency radiation, microwave radiation). These different kinds of EMF pollution are typically measured with different types of meters.

It is important that you understand exactly what type (or types) of EMF your electrosmog meter is designed to measure. In our experience these meters are usually meant to measure ambient AC magnetic fields, AC electric fields, or radio frequency (RF) fields. They are NOT effective for measuring dirty electricity. Here are a few reasons why…

  • The frequency range covered by most electrosmog meters does not cover all dirty electricity frequencies.
  • Electrosmog meters are not typically sensitive enough on the lower end to register levels of dirty electricity considered “too high” by experts in the field.
  • Most electrosmog meters are unable to distinguish between the 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields from standard AC electricity and the higher frequency electric and magnetic fields associated with dirty electricity.

To measure dirty electricity, you need an oscilloscope or plug-in EMI meter.

An oscilloscope and spectrum analyzer provide the best way to analyze specific characteristics of the dirty electricity present on building wires. Unfortunately, these tools can be quite expensive and require significant expertise and experience to use effectively.

A much easier and cost-effective way to measure dirty electricity on building circuits is to use a plug-in EMI (electromagnetic interference) meter, also known as a line noise meter or microsurge meter. Two examples of such meters are the Greenwave Broadband EMI Meter and the Stetzerizer Microsurge Meter. These meters are easy to use. Simply plug them into electrical outlets to find out how much dirty electricity is present on nearby wiring. These meters are also very useful for guiding the installation of dirty electricity filters for optimal results. They can help you determine the best number of filters to install in each room and which combination of electrical outlets to choose for installation.

The table below provides some basic information about the Greenwave and Stetzerizer meters.

GREENWAVE
Broadband EMI Meter
STETZERIZER
Microsurge Meter
Frequency Range 3 kHz – 10,000 kHz 4 kHz – 100 kHz
Measurement Units Millivolts (mV) Graham-Stetzer (GS) Units
Measurement Range
(Sensitivity)
1 – 1999 mV 1 – 2000 GS Units
Audio Feature YES
Let’s you listen to the dirty electricity (i.e., electrical noise) present on building wiring.
NO
Other Special Features

Makes gauging the effectiveness of dirty electricity filters easy.

  • BEFORE filter and AFTER filter readings can be displayed on the same screen simultaneously.
  • Display screen also shows % reduction in total EMI noise following filter installation.
N/A
I have a Trifield Meter. Can I use it to measure dirty electricity?

No they will not.

The Trifield 100XE and the newer Trifield TF2 are combination meters designed to measure ambient AC electric fields, AC magnetic fields, and radio frequency (RF) fields. These meters are NOT effective for measuring dirty electricity. Here are a few reasons why…

  • The frequency range covered by these meters does not cover all dirty electricity frequencies.
  • These meters are not sensitive enough on the lower end to register levels of dirty electricity considered “too high” by experts in the field.
  • These meters are unable to distinguish between the 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields from standard AC electricity and the higher frequency electric and magnetic fields associated with dirty electricity.

To measure dirty electricity, you need an oscilloscope or plug-in EMI meter.

An oscilloscope and spectrum analyzer provide the best way to analyze specific characteristics of the dirty electricity present on building wires. Unfortunately, these tools can be quite expensive and require significant expertise and experience to use effectively.

A much easier and cost-effective way to measure dirty electricity on building circuits is to use a plug-in EMI (electromagnetic interference) meter, also known as a line noise meter or microsurge meter. Two examples of such meters are the Greenwave Broadband EMI Meter and the Stetzerizer Microsurge Meter. These meters are easy to use. Simply plug them into electrical outlets to find out how much dirty electricity is present on nearby wiring. These meters are also very useful for guiding the installation of dirty electricity filters for optimal results. They can help you determine the best number of filters to install in each room and which combination of electrical outlets to choose for installation.

The table below provides some basic information about the Greenwave and Stetzerizer meters.

  GREENWAVE
Broadband EMI Meter
STETZERIZER
Microsurge Meter
Frequency Range 3 kHz – 10,000 kHz 4 kHz – 100 kHz
Measurement Units Millivolts (mV) Graham-Stetzer (GS) Units
Measurement Range
(Sensitivity)
1 – 1999 mV 1 – 2000 GS Units
Audio Feature YES
Let’s you listen to the dirty electricity (i.e., electrical noise) present on building wiring.
NO
Other Special Features

Makes gauging the effectiveness of dirty electricity filters easy.

  • BEFORE filter and AFTER filter readings can be displayed on the same screen simultaneously.
  • Display screen also shows % reduction in total EMI noise following filter installation.
N/A
I have a Cornet ED88T meter. Can I use it to measure dirty electricity?

No they will not.

The Cornet ED88T is a combination meter designed to measure ambient AC electric fields, AC magnetic fields, and radio frequency (RF) fields. This meter is NOT effective for measuring dirty electricity. Here are a few reasons why…

  • The frequency range covered by this meter does not cover all dirty electricity frequencies.

  • The meter is not sensitive enough on the lower end to register levels of dirty electricity considered “too high” by experts in the field.
  • The meter is unable to distinguish between the 60 Hz electric and magnetic fields from standard AC electricity and the higher frequency electric and magnetic fields associated with dirty electricity.

To measure dirty electricity, you need an oscilloscope or plug-in EMI meter.

An oscilloscope and spectrum analyzer provide the best way to analyze specific characteristics of the dirty electricity present on building wires. Unfortunately, these tools can be quite expensive and require significant expertise and experience to use effectively.

A much easier and cost-effective way to measure dirty electricity on building circuits is to use a plug-in EMI (electromagnetic interference) meter, also known as a line noise meter or microsurge meter. Two examples of such meters are the Greenwave Broadband EMI Meter and the Stetzerizer Microsurge Meter. These meters are easy to use. Simply plug them into electrical outlets to find out how much dirty electricity is present on nearby wiring. These meters are also very useful for guiding the installation of dirty electricity filters for optimal results. They can help you determine the best number of filters to install in each room and which combination of electrical outlets to choose for installation.

The table below provides some basic information about the Greenwave and Stetzerizer meters.

  GREENWAVE
Broadband EMI Meter
STETZERIZER
Microsurge Meter
Frequency Range 3 kHz – 10,000 kHz 4 kHz – 100 kHz
Measurement Units Millivolts (mV) Graham-Stetzer (GS) Units
Measurement Range
(Sensitivity)
1 – 1999 mV 1 – 2000 GS Units
Audio Feature YES
Let’s you listen to the dirty electricity (i.e., electrical noise) present on building wiring.
NO
Other Special Features

Makes gauging the effectiveness of dirty electricity filters easy.

  • BEFORE filter and AFTER filter readings can be displayed on the same screen simultaneously.
  • Display screen also shows % reduction in total EMI noise following filter installation.
N/A
I am trying to lower my exposure to EMF’s. Will Greenwave filters take care of all the EMF’s in my home?

No they will not.

Greenwave filters target ONE type of EMF pollution in homes and other buildings: DIRTY ELECTRICITY. They do not reduce power frequency AC electric and magnetic fields or wireless radiation.

As background, there are 4 types of EMF pollution – i.e., artificial electromagnetic fields (radiation) – common in homes and other buildings today. These different types of EMF pollution require different kinds of meters for measurement and often different remediation strategies. Here is a brief summary of the 4 types of EMF pollution.


WIRELESS RADIATION

Wireless radiation refers to the electromagnetic fields/radiation (EMF/EMR) created by devices and infrastructure that send information (e.g., voice, video, data,…) from one place to another through the air rather than via wires or cables. This type of EMF pollution is also called radio frequency (RF) radiation and microwave radiation and is nearly everywhere these days.

Common sources of wireless radiation include cordless phones, cell phones, cell towers/antennas, WiFi (wireless Internet), laptops, tablets, video game systems, smart watches and other wearable technologies, smart utility meters, wireless baby monitors, wireless security systems, GPS, airport radar, police and fire broadcast towers, radio and television broadcast towers, and much more!

To measure wireless radiation, you need a radio frequency (RF) meter or a combination meter with an RF setting.

LEARN MORE about Wireless Radiation and how to reduce your exposure
(link to wireless radiation page on website)


POWER FREQUENCY AC ELECTRIC FIELDS

Power frequency AC electric fields refer to the extremely low frequency (ELF) electric fields emitted by items that distribute and use conventional 60 Hertz, 120 Volt AC electricity. These fields are produced by VOLTAGE, which is the force or pressure ready to push electrical current through power lines, wires (circuits), cords, etc. AC electric fields are present even when electrical current is NOT flowing. For example, a lamp cord that is plugged into an outlet will emit an electric field even when the lamp is turned off. The field will go away only after the lamp is unplugged.

Common sources of AC electric fields include power lines, electrical wiring (circuits), power cords and strips, and appliances and other devices than run on electricity.

To measure AC electric fields, you need an electric field strength meter, a body voltage meter, or a combination meter with an AC electric field setting.

LEARN MORE about AC Electric Fields and how to reduce your exposure
(link to AC electric fields page on website)

POWER FREQUENCY AC MAGNETIC FIELDS

Power frequency AC magnetic fields refer to the extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields emitted by items that distribute and use conventional 60 Hertz, 120 Volt AC electricity. These fields are produced by the FLOW of electrical current.  Unlike AC electric fields, magnetic fields are present only when electrical current is acutally flowing. For example: A hair dryer that is plugged into an outlet and turned ON will emit both AC magnetic and electric fields. When the hair dryer is switched OFF, current flow to the dryer stops, and the AC magnetic fields goes away. The AC electric field, which is produced by voltage rather than current flow, will remain until the hair dryer is unplugged from the outlet.

Common sources of AC magnetic fields include power lines, electricity substations and transformers, electric meters, circuit breaker panels, electric appliances/tools/devices with motors or transformers, old knob and tube wiring, wiring errors in branch circuits (e.g., improper neutral-to-neutral and neutral-to-ground connections), and current on grounding paths such as metal water pipes, the sheathing for cable TV lines, etc.

To measure AC magnetic fields, you need a gauss meter or a combination meter with an AC magnetic field setting.

LEARN MORE about AC Magnetic Fields and how to reduce your exposure
(link to AC magnetic fields page on website)

DIRTY ELECTRICITY

Dirty electricity is created by modern electronics and other electrical devices that must change or manipulate conventional 60 Hertz, 120 Volt AC electricity in one way or another in order to operate. These changes and manipulations create surges and spikes of electromagnetic energy (i.e., harmonics and voltage transients) that travel along building wires where only conventional (“clean”) AC electricity should be. Once created, dirty electricity can travel throughout a building and from one building to another via wiring, power lines, and other means. It radiates EMF pollution approximately 6 feet into rooms as it travels.

Common sources of dirty electricity include light dimmer switches, compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs), fluorescent tubes, LED light bulbs, energy efficient appliances, solar panel inverters, smart meters, chargers for cell phones and other devices, and most consumer electronics (for example: computers, printers, TVs, video game systems, and much more).

To measure dirty electricity effectively, you need an oscilloscope and spectrum analyzer or a plug-in EMI meter, also known as a line noise meter or microsurge meter.

  • An oscilloscope and spectrum analyzer provide the best way to analyze specific characteristics of the dirty electricity present on building wires. Unfortunately, these tools can be quite expensive and require significant expertise and experience to use effectively.

  • A plug-in EMI meter, such as Greenwave Broadband EMI meter, provides a much easier and cost-effective way for most people to measure the level of dirty electricity on building circuits. This type of meter is easy to use. Simply plug it into electrical outlets to find out how much dirty electricity is present on nearby wiring. Plug-in EMI meters are also very useful for guiding the installation of dirty electricity filters for optimal results. They can help you determine the best number of filters to install in each room and which combination of electrical outlets to choose for installation.

Dirty electricity is the one type of EMF pollution that can be effective filtered. Greenwave filters are designed to significantly reduce the level of dirty electricity present on the wiring in buildings. The less dirty electricity there is traveling along building wires, the less that will radiate into rooms where people spend time. As mentioned previously, Greenwave filters target dirty electricity. They do NOT get rid of power frequency AC electric and magnetic fields or wireless radiation.

LEARN MORE about Dirty Electricity and how to reduce your exposure
(link to dirty electricity page on website)

After I installed the filters I was able to get the dirty electricity levels down to around 80 from 400. I kept adding filters to try and get the levels lower but they didn’t do much. Why is that?

The goal is to get the number below 50. Sometimes, for a variety of reasons, that’s not always possible.

There is a point where adding filters only goes so far. Most homes, however, can achieve the optimal numbers with 2 – 3 filters per room. The Greenwave Meter helps greatly with understanding where to place the filters.

What is the difference between your filter and the Stetzer Filter?

Heres a link to the comparison of our filters and Stetzers. – https://greenwavefilters.com/greenwave-filters-versus-stetzerizer-filters/

We typically outperform Stetzer Filters side by side using the Stetzer meter for measurement by about 5 – 15%.

Greenwave filters are grounded and have a 3 prong (grounded) outlet on the bottom so you don’t lose the outlet. 

Greenwave filters are RoHS certified. (no toxic materials or heavy metals in the filter). Stetzers are not. 

Greenwave filters cover a wider range of frequencies. 

Greenwave filters are manufactured by AstrodyneTDI, a US company.\

We hired expert EMI/EMF engineers to design the filters.

Does Greenwave make a whole house solution?

Greenwave does not have a whole house solution.  Whole house solutions are primarily effective at mitigating the dirty electricity coming into the home from the grid/utility.  Typically you will still need filters in each room because dirty electricity is created in the house as well.

See a partial list of devices that create dirty electricity here – https://greenwavefilters.com/dirty-electricity/

I heard that plug in filters like Greenwave make the EMF problem worse, not better. Whats the story?

All appliances as well as the wiring in your home have a magnetic field.  Greenwave and similar filters also have a magnetic because they are actively pulling a volt of electricity through them to filter out the DE.

The magnetic field will typically fall of at between 6 and 10 inches according to Maxwells Equation (a Physics principal). BTW, Dirty electricity comes into the environment as far as 6 – 7 feet.

I have heard that solar panels may emit more EMF radiation. Is this true? Are solar panels more harmful than they are good?

Solar inverters typically produce a large amount of dirty electricity sometimes doubling it in a home.

Greenwave Filters work very well to reduce the levels.

Can I plug a power strip into the back of the filter?

Yes, anything you plug into a standard US outlet can be plugged into a Greenwave filter.

Are the filters reducing DE at the outlet or on the wiring.

The filters are mitigating DE on the powerline. The outlet is simply how the filters access it.

Why do you include a receptacle tester in orders of 4 or more filters?

Greenwave is on a mission to help people clean up their electrical environments.

Wiring errors at the outlet and in the wall can create additional magnetic fields, electric fields and dirty electricity. We believe customers should be aware of these errors.  We include the tester as a courtesy so customers can check their outlets.

Why do the Greenwave Filters have a ground and the Stetzer filters do not?

The ground allows for a tighter connection to the outlet. That enhances the performance of the filters. In addition, our filters have a grounded outlet on the bottom so you don’t lose an outlet when plugging in our filters.

Grounded outlets can more safely provide power to devices including computers and televisions. These outlets are less likely to cause short circuits compared to ungrounded outlets.

What are EMF and EMI?

If you would like additional help determining your filter needs, please contact Greenwave at [email protected] or 1-800-506-6098.

How many Greenwave filters do I need?

Many people ask us whether they will need a filter for every electrical outlet in their environment. In most cases the answer is NO.

The general guidelines below can help you calculate the number of Greenwave filters you will need for your environment. If you would like additional help determining your filter needs, please contact Greenwave at [email protected] or 1-800-506-6098.

HOME ENVIRONMENTS

Most rooms within homes typically require 1 to 4 filters to reduce dirty electricity to acceptable levels. Two Greenwave filters are usually needed to reduce dirty electricity within average-sized rooms (e.g., bedroom, dining room). Rooms with heavy concentrations of electronics (e.g., media room, kitchen, home office) may require more than two filters (3-4), while smaller rooms, such as bathrooms, usually require only one.

The CHART below provides additional information about the number of Greenwave filters typically recommended for most rooms within homes (e.g., houses, apartments, condos).

Type of Room Number of Filters Typically Needed
Kitchen, Family Room, Living Room, Media Room, Home Office 3 – 4 filters (each)
Bedroom, Dining Room, Laundry Room, 2 filters (each)
Bathroom, Walk-In Closet 1 filter (each)
Basement, Garage, Tool Shed, Workshop 1 – 2 filters (for every 150 square feet)

 

WORKPLACE/BUSINESS ENVIRONMENTS

2 to 3 filters for every 100 square feet

SCHOOLS

5 filters per classroom

How do I install Greenwave filters?

Greenwave filters are easy to install. Simply plug them into electrical outlets to start reducing dirty electricity immediately.

For best results, the filters should be installed as close as possible to devices known to generate dirty electricity (e.g., electronic equipment, fluorescent lighting, light dimmer switches, SMART meters, appliances/devices with internal motors).

In addition, we recommend using Greenwave’s Broadband EMI Meter to guide filter installation. This meter can help you identify significant sources of dirty electricity in your environment and determine the best number of Greenwave filters to install in each room for optimal results. It can also show you how much dirty electricity the filters are eliminating. The meter displays “BEFORE filter” and “AFTER filter” EMI measurements (in  millivolts) on the same screen simultaneously. The “AFTER filter” display screen also shows the percent reduction in local “electrical noise density.”

Click the links below for more detailed instructions for using Greenwave’s dirty electricity filters and meter.

GREENWAVE FILTER INSTRUCTIONS

GREENWAVE METER INSTRUCTIONS

Can Greenwave filters be plugged into power strips?

Yes, as long as there is sufficient space.

What is the difference between Greenwave filters and Graham-Stetzer (Stetzerizer) filters?

Both types of plug-in filters reduce the level of dirty electricity present on the wiring in buildings. Overall, Greenwave filters offer more features than Stetzerizer filters. Most of our filter models include a built-in outlet at their base for plug-through convenience and are both safety certified and RoHS compliant.

LEARN MORE

I plugged a filter into an outlet and it started to buzz. Is there a problem?

This usually means the filter is overloaded. In other words, there is more dirty electricity on nearby wiring than the filter can reduce sufficiently on its own. This problem can usually be resolved by installing another filter in the same outlet (using a power strip or electrical tee) or 1 to 2 filters in nearby outlets or power strips.

If the buzzing doesn’t stop after installing additional filters, contact Greenwave.

I saw a small spark and hear a popping sound as I plugged in a Greenwave filter. Is something wrong?

NO, this often happens as electrical energy “loads into” the capacitor technology used by the filters. It is not dangerous to you or your Greenwave filters. Our filters undergo rigorous safety testing and are safety certified.